Jack’s Speech

Posted by on September 12, 2012 in Ramblings | 3 comments

Yesterday was a big day for us. We finally got an evaluation on Jack’s speech. It was a long day for the little guy. Over and hour and half in a small confined space with a lady in a white coat. It had all the makings for a full bore meltdown. I was so proud of him. He pulled it off. We have the information we need. So so much I could say about the experience.

First, the therapist. Wow! She said some things that still have me scratching my head. I think that there is a camaraderie among adoptive parents. You feel open to share more. In some cases it’s not always a good thing. Frankly, I don’t think I should share some of the opinions that she shared with me. I don’t want to call them offensive but for someone in the medical community doing what she does…well, I need to stop. As Ray says, I would rather have someone see Jack that knows what they are doing with a abrasive outlook or personality than someone who doesn’t know what they are doing and is as sweet as honey. Actually she is very nice. We have differing opinions on what makes Jack act the way he acts, particularly when he is nervous. Yep. Need. To. Stop.

The Prognosis: Jack’s language is severely delayed. Nothing new to us. We knew that going in. I have to say as the evaluation progressed, it was more about evaluating what I know he can communicate. Frankly, as I sat checking off words it is amazing. Even in the last 6 weeks, how much progress he’s made is fabulous. If you had asked me going into the meeting how large Jack’s vocabulary is, I would have put it around 40-50 words. As I began to fill out the paperwork, he has 75+ words that he uses in his vocabulary. While that’s not good for a four-year old, it’s great for Jack right now so I’ll take it. He’s vocabulary puts him at just over 12 months developmentally. The next test to determine how he uses his vocabulary put his development between 22-24 months. It is unusual to have a gap this large. As I told this therapist, it’s also unusual to be left in a crib until you are three and a half.

Jack did the most complicated puzzles that she could bring out. In fact, one of them I’m not sure Bria would have figured out as fast as Jack. It would be interesting to see them working side by side. He was nervous and did act out a bit but I was thankful that he didn’t meltdown and refuse to talk. In the end, we decided to have a pediatrician who specializes in growth delays take a look at him. ADD, ADHA and autism have been ruled out for now. His coping mechanisms are STRANGE and get STRANGER every day. He still checks himself out but not as often. By that I mean, he goes off in his own world even if you are trying to talk to him. I’m interested see what the next doctor says. Hopefully Jack will behave just as well and we can get a realistic diagnosis. The other step is back to the school to get more evaluations for speech therapy and preschool. This is going to be a long uphill battle. I made inroads yesterday by having a conversation with the principal.

So today, we’re off to the school to start the next step. As always, we appreciate prayers. Technically Jack should start kindergarten in the fall. At this point, it would take a true miracle to get him caught up in time. We’re going to do everything we can for him and that included lots of prayer and faith.

Thanks for the texts and phone calls yesterday. It’s so nice to know that Jack has so many people in his corner.

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3 Comments

  1. I’ve never read your blog before and I just happened to click over from an adoptive friend’s blog because it said speech! I am in college and want to be a Speech Therapist BECAUSE I have a heart for adoption and would like to specialize in children with learning delays because of time spent in orphanages. I think it’d be good to have someone who could combine knowledge of attachment/adjustment behavior with speech intervention. Anyways, its very encouraging to hear your experience and see that there IS a need, and its not just something I dreamed up in my head :) Thanks for sharing!

  2. Our sons are very similar. I am not sure if you have read the connected child and really it is a difficult book for kids still learning language BUT I do think the information on the seratonin levels are key for our boys. We really work at keeping that as level as possible and it has helped some. It affects language, among a ton of other areas. Blessings, God knew you were the perfect momma for him! And I am sorry for the idiots in the medical field (and I can say that because I work in the field LOL!)

  3. Glad you are getting answers and will pray. I do want to say… it does not matter that he doesn’t start to K on time!!! I always told parents, it is much better to give them an extra year of childhood than rushing them to an extra year of adulthood!!! XO

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